Educational Project 3 Science, Technology, and Inclusive Society

Units
"Life & the Environment" Unit / "Science, Technology, & Society" Unit
Representatives
Yuichiro Watanabe, Shigeru Masuda, and Kohji Ishihara

The goal of this project is to raise the awareness of how technological innovations in basic and applied science may contribute to an inclusive society based on the principles of humanism. Lectures will be held with an emphasis on real-world tangible problems, and students will have the chance to gain hands-on experience of the state-of-the-art scientific and technological research. The combination of theoretical and experimental approaches will allow students to acquire concrete problem-solving skills. This project will emphasize technology-based life science and environmental issues as well as the challenges facing the implementation of a barrier-free society.

Classes Offered by the Project

Seminar in the Integrated Human Sciences for Cultural Diversity V
("Life & the Environment" Unit)

  1. "Environmental elements, Radioactivity and Human Society"
    After acquiring the accurate knowledge of the principles underlying environmental elements and radioactivity, students will be encouraged to think about regulations, public education, and the direction to which scientific and technological innovations may be developing. Lectures will be held from a broad perspective, encompassing the standpoints of several natural science disciplines. Legal regulations and risk theory will also be considered. To further familiarize students with the material, we will encourage them to apply the knowledge that they gained during the lectures when measuring the radioactivity and trace elements of environmental samples using the latest equipment.
  2. "Chemicals and Human Society"
    Having acquired an accurate understanding of the structure and function of familiar chemicals encountered in the environment, food, and pharmaceutical drugs as well as of the related analytical techniques, students will be challenged to think about the regulations that may be drawn up and about the ways in which public education may be conducted. Lectures will adopt a broad perspective that encompasses the standpoints of several natural science disciplines. Legal regulations and risk theory will also be considered. As part of lab practice, chemical trace analysis will be performed on samples from food and the environment.

Seminar in the Integrated Human Sciences for Cultural Diversity VI
("Science, Technology, & Society" Unit)

  1. "Social Implications of Advances in Life Science"
    Nowadays life science drastically proceeds, and we have reached the place to knock the door for completely understanding the brain. Life science also enables us to induce artificial organs and to predict diseases from genome sequences. From these points, it is hoped that these studies are fed back to our society. Relationship between life sciences and our society is getting more necessary, but there are only a few platforms to learn their issues. In this seminar, we want to discuss how life science can and should cooperate with the society. In addition to several lectures, we will visit laboratories in which frontier science are extensively studied, and have an experience of basic experiments about brain science.

Fieldwork in the Integrated Human Sciences for Cultural Diversity III
("Science, Technology, and Inclusive Society" Project)

  1. "Real-Life Social Barriers: Japan"
    At "Bethel's House", Urakawa, (a small fishing village in the Northern island of Hokkaido), students will meet and have discussions with persons who have mental disorders as well as with the members of their supporting community, and their family members. Students will be challenged to think of those scientific and technological innovations that may bring solutions to this community.
  2. "Real-Life Social Barriers: Abroad"
    Through visiting foreign communities and organizations involved with mental health concerns, students will meet and have discussions with persons who have disabilities as well as with the members of their supporting community, and their family members. As in the course, entitled "Real-Life Social Barriers: Japan", above, students will find themselves challenged to think of those scientific and technological innovations may bring solutions to the problems that the community that they visit is facing. In addition, students will have the chance to participate in seminars organized in collaboration with foreign academics and research institutions and deliberate the question of how the activities in a variety of fields can be coordinated.